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Articles and Reviews

Zone Music Reporter

“All thirteen songs on Rear View seem to have a life of their own. Each song is a chapter that celebrates a union of hearts, minds and talents of two people that have music running in their veins. And all with the common element of balance. Let me close with the words of the poet Bob Dylan who said, “Art is the perpetual motion of illusion. The highest purpose of art is to inspire. What else can you do? What else can you do for any one, but inspire them?”

We are inspired.” Read More

Zone Music Reporter

“There’s just so much great music on Rear View!”

“I could go and on, praising the simpatico of the musicians and the seamless fusion of various genres within selected songs, but you’re just going to have to trust me when I urge you to grab a copy of Rear View and hear its many delights for yourself.” Read more

Journeyscapes Radio

Featuring thirteen remastered compositions which have been culled from twenty-five years of previously released material, the album highlights some of the duo’s best moments in musical craftsmanship. Read More

Mainly Piano

Rear View is a 25-year retrospective of the music of Perpetual Motion. The founding and core members of the group are violinist Josie Quick and guitarist Tom Carleno, two extraordinary musicians…Read More

MuzikMan Reviews

The combination of Josie’s progressive melodic violin playing and the gentle, rhythmic and Latin influenced guitar provided by partner Tom Carleno makes for sweet music.  The broad strokes of sound painted on their musical canvas is the perfect marriage of sound, color, and vibrations. Read More

Contemporary Fusion Reviews

Perpetual Motion – REAR VIEW:  I’ve reviewed this group before (issue # 139, specifically), featuring two high-talent players (Josie Quick – electric and acoustic violins, mandolin, percussion and Tom Carleno – guitars), as well as many others, since this is a 25-year retrospective kind of album.  What you will hear when the album is final/ready (towards the end of January 2017) is some of the most forward-looking string-based work you’ve ever heard!

One World Music

Rear View by Tom Carleno and Josie Quick is a timeless offering of great tunes, wonderfully encapsulating musical moments of reverie, a compilation of compositions that span a quarter of a century. If you know of the artist’s work, this is a must get purchase, but if you don’t, but like the combination of perfectly balanced and superbly produced instrumental music, I would recommend putting this one on your musical radar as quick as you can.

Westword Magazine’s 100 Colorado Creatives

Violinist Josie Quick is always busy, whether she’s teaching, serenading a romantic wedding proposal, jamming with herself via looping, laying down tracks in the studio with Perpetual Motion, a jazz duo she shares with guitarist husband Tom Carleno, or playing with Coyote Poets of the Universe, a highly collaborative band she dubs “Progressive Alternative Americana.” She’s also a skilled ceramic artist, creating signature zen pots inspired by totemic images. Quick’s answers to the 100CC questionnaire follow. Read more

Stapleton Front Porch
July, 2014

Perpetual Motion
String Theory
This great little CD came in as part of a package for guitarist Tom Carleno..on this earlier outing (2006.Songs like the high energy “Spring Fever” will have you listening to this tune over and over again. “Jungle Spirits” was the clear winner for my pick as favorite, the changes are intricate and beautiful. I give Tom & crew a MOST HIGHLY RECOMMENDED for this CD.

Colorado Talent Monthly, February 2014

(Go to page 30)

Zone Music Reporter Review, Dec 2014

Perpetual Motion
Christmas Time Is Here
Perpetual Motion is an acoustic world fusion ensemble headed by guitarist Tom Carleno and his wife, violinist/mandolin player Josie Quick, with fretless bassist Michael Olson and drummer Rob Chamberlin. They’ve been a staple of the Denver music scene for years and this wonderful collection of both holiday standards and solid originals shows why such is the case. Their simpatico sense of musicianship is the key to this album. Nearly every track has a different combination of the four players and two songs also feature the sultry jazz vocals of guest star Alyson Hayes-Myers: the Vince Guaraldi classic “Christmas Time is Here” and “Silent Night.” The four originals fit in perfectly with the other seven carols. Style-wise, the group’s music is a cross between folk, swing, jazz and the early instrumental works from Windham Hill. The group’s take on “The Little Drummer Boy” (here titled “The Little Drummer Boy (from Ipanema)” features Quick on electric violin and spices up the album with some bossa nova flavors. All in all, Christmas Time Is Here is a delight and a great addition to your holiday music collection.


Denver Public Library concert review, August 28, 2012.

Sometimes it is worth it to stop and enjoy something on your journey, rather than to always be in perpetual motion. This past Saturday we got to do both. Denver locals Josie Quick and Tom Carleno brought Perpetual Motion to Fresh City Life.

Right off, I’ll tell you that, if you missed this wonderful concert, we will be bringing Perpetual Motion back for an encore in the new year. They are fantastic!

This sought-after duo blends acoustic world music into a bright fusion of sounds. Mixing international styles, Perpetual Motion moves effortlessly between the traditions of Central and South American folk, progressive jazz, blues and rock. This eclectic approach to music informs their original compositions and cover tunes.

Perpetual Motion’s energy is what drives this dynamic group. Their eclectic jazz sound is a style of their own creation. Always on the move, their adept arrangements, great original pieces, and energetic stage presence are pitch perfect. You just have to hear them! If you missed them, stay tuned — they’ll be back to energize the great hall again.

Hope to see you at one of our upcoming fall concerts. Full Fresh City Life Calendar here.

 

Voice
March 10, 2005
Concert features genre-spanning sound

By Peter Jones
What do you get when you cross a guitarist who can’t write lyrics with a violinist who can’t sing?

Instrumentals, hopefully.

“We focus on our strengths,” violinist Josie Quick laughed.

She and husband Tom Carleno are the nucleus of Perpetual Motion. The Denver band’s self-described style is “dynamic acoustic jazz, combining blues, rock, Latin and more.”

“More,” in this case, spans bluegrass to surf music.

“When people ask me what kind of music we play, I just say good,” Quick said. “It’s hard to put a label on it.”

Perpetual Motion brings its genre-spanning sound to the Lone Tree Public Library March 13 for a free concert.

It was not for lack of trying that Perpetual Motion gave up on putting words to its music. The couple has tried tapping into its love for Beatles lyrics,but the results were uniformly disappointing – more “moon in June” than “Here Comes the Sun.” Voices were not their best instruments either, they admit.

The couple has, however, incorporated lyrical melodies and a kind of vocal phrasing into their music. Carleno-Quick compositions are not so much instrumentals, they say, but songs without words.

“Surfing on Cloud Nine” is described in CD liner notes as “a song about the joy of being alive.” That may surprise listeners who assumed that instrumentals were not “about” anything.

“We make the effort to make the melodies hummable. When I’m playing, I try to think vocally. I think where the breath would be if we had a singer,” Quick explained.

Perpetual Motion’s material ranges from the American folk roots in “The Wyoming Blues” to the scat-jazz of Wheels are Turning. “Surf ‘n Turf” honors surf guitar king Dick Dale.

Despite appearances to the contrary, the eclectic husband and wife team was not always this comfortable in its musical skin.

Quick was originally a “classical music nerd” who was growing steadily tired of playing note-for-note Beethoven in school assemblies. Her epiphany came from an unlikely source, a fiddle-based, southern-rock hit by the Doobie Brothers.

“I was just enthralled by “Black Water,” she said. “I realized I could play any style I wanted to on the violin.”

By the late 1980s, she was teaching the same lesson in a Denver music store, where Carleno happened to teach guitar down the hall.

Before long, the frustrated rock musician was smitten by his female colleague, His opening line had more truth than most, however.

“I’ve written some music. I’d like to hear what it would sound like with a violin,” Quick can remember him saying to her one day. “He thought he was so smooth, as cheesy as it was.”

A love connection was not all that gelled. Quick’s violin actually did sound pretty good with Carleno’s jazzy material.

Perpetual Motion was ready to move.

Although the band has seen as revolving door of personnel over the years, including two veterans of Boulder County’s Wind Machine, the married couple has always been the stable calm in the group.

Three or four can be a crowd sometimes, anyway.

“It’ll be just the two of us at the library,” Quick said.

Perpetual Motion will perform March 13, 2 p.m. The Lone Tree Public Library is located at 8827 Lone Tree Parkway. The concert is free, but reservations are required. Call  303-799-4446 .

 

Recently featured in Rocky Mountain News Talent Show

 

 

Perpetual Motion “Christmas Time is Here”

Judy B.
GoGo Magazine, January 21, 2002

What a beautiful and inspired record this is. And, it’s holiday tunes no less. Making an album of traditional Christmas songs is tricky because the songs are sooooo overplayed during December, and because tasteful can turn to tacky in the blink of an eye.

Perpetual Motion’s holiday release brings high quality musicianship and creative instrumental arranging (very important on a record such as this) to standards such as “Joy to the World,” “Carol of the Bells,” and “Do You Hear What I Hear.” Also included is the title track by Vince Guaraldi and some well-placed original tunes like “Northern Lights” and “Nova.”

Perpetual Motion usually records instrumental records that fit in well with mellow jazz or New Age listeners. The founding duo of Perpetual Motion, guitarist Tom Carleno and violinist Josie Quick have such huge musical ears, however, that the music stays fresh and accessible to any “type” of fan with high musical standards. Even on a Christmas CD, the duo does not disappoint.

Surprise your family by putting on a CD filled with the holiday spirit during dinner this year. Tell them it’s a local band. How cool is that?

 

 

Profilin’  from the Rocky Mountain Bullhorn June 2001Perpetual Motionby Judy BradyThe phrase “perpetual motion” conjures up images of constant
change, innovation and movement–like an interactive Energizer
bunny, meeting every new challenge with a step forward, a new
idea and an unflagging energy.Colorado musicians Tom Carleno and Josie Quick named their band
Perpetual Motion, making the first of many bold statements
regarding their instrumental music. In the twelve years since the
two got together, Carleno and Quick have utilized a gamut of
influences, tastes and musical resources to form an unusual alliance
in the expanding Colorado music scene.Sometimes their music sounds like pop, or maybe classical. No, it,s
blues, maybe classic rock, or jazz. We should know by now that the
easier a band is to categorize, the crappier the music. But Quick and
Carleno bring out the beauty of acoustic music without lulling us to
sleep. Their selection of tunes, Carleno,s adept arrangements and
their energetic stage presence are always entertaining.Unusual, but certainly the backbone of the group,s sound, is
Quick,s violin. It,s not the symphony style we know from
Beethoven records and diamond commercials, but a much more raw
and emotional tone amplified to complement Carleno,s guitar.Their versatility makes the band great for intimate settings but can
transfer well to larger venues. And although their artistry and love
of the music are apparent as a duo, they have released three albums
featuring a number of stellar local musicians.Perpetual Motion,s appeal reaches a wide audience through the
tasteful use of great original pieces and an odd assortment of
cover-tune arrangements. Drawing from songs on their 1997 release,
Surfing on Cloud Nine, the band can easily shift to a fabulous
rendition of “Josie” from Steely Dan or The Beatles,s “Dear
Prudence.” And it all seems to work.At a time when many musicians think that louder, faster and more
aggressive is better, the music fan needs a moment to listen to
quality music that is not only artistic in its nature, but introspective
and inspiring. Carleno and Quick bring the sort of sensitivity to
their music that reveals professional skill and training along with a
warm chemistry extending past the microphonesalways different,
and always moving.

riff magazine cover
artist of the month - perpetual motion
MEET PERPETUAL MOTION By 
Deana Gloyd
Sitting down to dinner in a restaurant with guitarist Tom Carleno and violinist Josie Quick was like meeting old friends that somehow you had never really met. Josie, with her warm engaging smile, and Tom with his attentive but subtle nature instantly made me feel quite at home. This warmth and sincerity that one experiences when meeting them translates into their musical style, which is difficult at best to categorize. Kate Lavin, of the Daily Staff Writer, states that their compositions are “a unique style of original music.” Linda Gruno, of Backbeat, indicates that their music showcases “the trio’s emotion, interplay, and sensuality.” While Kevin Duke, of Denver Live, feels that the music is both “mesmerizing” and “peacefully ambient.”

The musical style of Perpetual Motion is one that shows great depth in the ability to develop and perform several genres of music harmoniously. Josie feels that it was her Classical chamber experience that prepared her for the kind of music that she and Tom create. She describes their musical sound as “counter point” or a “musical conversation” that is going on between the instruments. Josie feels that what makes their music unique is this musical conversation that is similar to what she experienced in her string quartet work, rather than the stringency of individualized parts that are expressed through rock music. For Josie “counter point” between the instruments “is the epitome of joy. I just love the way [it sounds] when you have two voices, three voices, intertwining and talking to each other.” The melody is described as “melodic fragments” where Tom plays keynotes on his guitar that Josie echoes on her violin. The point of their style is to play in harmony with the other musicians, complementing each other’s sound. 

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Tom, who is the composer for the group, describes his composition style as hearing the whole composition in his head before he starts to write. He admitted that he had to pay more attention to the composing when he and Josie first started playing together. “I had to start thinking about how I could put another voice to this story. That was when I first started writing out her parts.” Josie laughs about the time when Tom asked her if she could play a tenth on the violin “A tenth on the violin is. ..a virtuosic interval,” Josie explains. “Yeah, I can play tenths”, she admits telling Tom. Then she adds, “He throws this thing at me that is not just parallel tenths but [also a piece] which goes from octaves to ninths,” This is no easy task for a violinist. It was at that point that the two began to develop a way that they could each write their own parts while still remaining in harmony with each other. Both Tom and Josie feel that this is one of the most interesting aspects of their musical relationship. “Tom will start playing melodies and I will begin to hear my own part in my head,” Josie told me. Eventually, the two join each other downstairs, where Tom practices and composes, and the musical piece is jointly written. Josie admits that she is now starting to compose her own music for the band but has not yet recorded her first song for release. 

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Other rotating members of the band also join the duo by writing their own parts into the harmony. Michael Olson, current acoustic bass player for the band, begins his part of the process after receiving a chart of the musical notes from Tom. These notes are “not written in stone,” states Michael, “If I have a better idea, I am to let them know.” At first this may appear as no great challenge; however, Michael assures me that the challenge is to “still fulfil the role of the bass player (while finding) something unique” to bring to the musical conversation. In addition, Michael must strive to create a separate melody from the other instruments. 

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The unique qualities of sound and writing style that characterize Perpetual Motion can be attributed, in part, to the musical influences of Josie Quick. When I asked Josie who her musical influences were I expected her response to be Franz Schubert, or George Frederic Handel; but instead she told me that one of her musical influences was the rock group Heart, while another was violinist Stephane Grappeli. I sat there thinking how diversely opposite these two musical influences were; yet her explanation reflected both the diversity and unity in her own music with Tom. Josie’s fascination with Heart stems from the fact that they were two women “who were good musicians, not just eye candy.” For Josie, Grappeli had a “clean, precise, very musical and melodic sound.” And, perhaps, it is in these two extremes that we find the best way to describe the sound that is Perpetual Motion -it is simply the transformation of emotional experiences into a musical conversation that is clean and precise and completely Perpetual Motion. 

Perpetual Motion at the House of Rock 
By Avaril 
The words “instrumental music can often have some alarming effects on people, especially those who consider themselves to be rock aficionados. Some shudder as image after image of elevators rush through their head, or, if they are in the younger set, they fall into spasms of faked dry heaves. But, then again, they have never heard instrumental music until they have heard Perpetual Motion. “Heard” is perhaps the wrong word. Perpetual Motion is an experience. 

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Somewhere on the back roads of Northglenn is the House of Rock; a small club with a big sound. And amidst the regular rough looking bar crowd, Tom Carleno and Josie Quick of Perpetual Motion set up their guitars and violins. With an easy, almost offhand manner, they complete their sound check, Josie steps to the mike to introduce their first song “Spring F ever” and they begin. And nothing else seems to matter after that. Josie’s fingers glide along the neck of the violin, her bow is quick and precise, her face a picture of serenity. Occasionally, she plucks the strings to add variety and dynamics to the song. They finish the song in a flourish. ..and everyone in the room sits there blinking for a few seconds as if they, don’t quite know where they are. Then the small crowd bursts into raucous applause. 

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In honor of the fact that they are playing at a “Rock” club, Perpetual Motion announces they will do a cover of Steely Dan’s “Josie”, for obvious reasons. So, now it is time to sit back and let the elevator music wash over you because surely it’s sacrilege to convert “Josie” into a violin instrumental. But Tom’s arrangement is impeccable and Josie infuses her violin with such rough energy that she brings out the very essence of the song. 

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So, the night continues with Perpetual Motion’s haunting melody “The Big Red Blues.” Tom plays an exquisite pure blues counterpoint to Josie’s violin. ..a combined sound that can give the listener that tingly “someone just walked over my grave” kind of chill. And while the chills run down your spine, the more vocal members of the crowd are clapping and shouting, “Whoo! Yeah!” 

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Let’s take a moment to look at the enthusiastic crowd. For all intents and purposes, they represent your basic stereotypical bar-going crowd. ..the ones you might expect to give stronger credence to a heavy rock group. But, they found something exceptional tonight. Or, perhaps, Josie and Tom gave them no choice. They held the crowd enthralled. 

The music just sucks you in…a movie in every song, Can you hear the children running and playing in “Jacob’s Pond”? You can’t help but think of the outdoors, water and the joy of youth, And “Zero Gravity ..stars…can’t think of anything but stars. (Am I the only one who hears a few bars from the theme of Close Encounters?) The musical images are so vivid they almost spring forth from the strings.

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Jumping from original songs to cover tunes like “Dear Prudence” and “Black Water”, Perpetual Motion shows that enviable elastic ability to change their sound at a moments notice. While it is easy to get caught up in the dizzying violin talent of Josie Quick, it is also Tom’s talent for songwriting and arrangement that makes Perpetual Motion such a listening experience. His guitar chords and constructs seem relatively simple compared to Josie,s violin work, but they are a perfect complement.  It is almost difficult to believe there are only two instruments on stage.

When Perpetual Motion winds up their set with “Wyoming Blues, there is an almost audible sigh of regret from the audience.  We had a casual fling with excellence and it was hard to let go.

From Riff Magazine January 2001
riffcdrev
Perpetual MotionBy Bobby BensleyJust the name Perpetual Motion implies that this band has a busy sound. With 3 CD releases Ready Willing and Able, Surfing on Cloud Nine and Christmas Time is Here under their belts this band has earned the name.Eclectic and melodic the music of this group is hard to nail down to just one genre. If forced to do so I would call it Progressive Jazz, but would be doing it a disservice, as it is much more. The music of Perpetual Motion is as varied as their influences.Guitarist Tom Carleno plays with a flavorful fingerstyle that incorporates many different open tunings. Drawing from a background of rock influences such as Queen, The Beetles and Al Stewart, Carleno sets the ambiance for their instrumental landscapes. Running the gambit from Jazz to Blue Grass to Celtic, Perpetual Motion is at once delicate and relaxing, as well as strong and masculine and they can shift between the two with ease.Violinist Josie Quick really brings an element of uniqueness to this group. Drawing heavily from such Classical influences as Jean Luc’ Ponte, Stephane Grappelli and Django Rienhardt she adds color and classical movement to the rich and interlaced melodies that set this group apart from the rest.On their release Surfing On Cloud Nine, Quick and Carleno trade rapid counterpoints of melody which build a strong dialog around the drum and base lines of Chad Johnson and Maft Deason. Richly textured and layered with sensuous melodies, Perpetual Motion simply delivers good music that will leave you whistling.While available at major outlets such as Borders, Tower Records and Twist and Shout, the full collection of Perpetual Motion releases is available online at www.perpetualmotion.net as well as www.hapiskratch.com.

>This is from Westword December 14, 2000

Holidaze

Unwrapping our annual roundup of musical season’s greetings — and beatings.
By Michael Roberts

A better… bet is Christmas Time Is Here, by the veteran Denver quartet called Perpetual Motion. Following a tasteful version of “Joy to the World” that also appears on Rocky Mountain Christmas, the combo enlivens “Northern Lights,” “It Came Upon a Midnight Clear” and the wittily titled “The Little Drummer Boy (From Ipanema)” via stylish arrangements and the refined violin playing of Josie Quick. No, it doesn’t rock — but not everything has to, ya know?

Christmas Time Is Here

 

This article ran in the The Daily on September 16, 2000Eclectic ensemble blends unlikely instruments, jazzBy Kate Lavin ,Daily Staff Writer

     Anyone who has ever gone out on a limb to get a date has to appreciate the sheer guts Tom Carleno of Perpetual Motion had when he used his own cheesy pickup line on violinist Josie Quick more than 10 years ago. Carleno, an acoustic guitarist, had played in several bands over the years. He was in-between groups when he met Quick at a Denver-area music store where they both taught private music lessons. The conducting casanova made a bold move in hopes of furthering both his musical career and his social life.
     Your typical bar hound probably would have winked at Quick before blurting out, “Hey baby, I think we could make beautiful music together.” Luckily for Quick, Carleno was a little more tactful, and instead opted for “I have some songs I’ve written. Would you like to get together sometime and play them?”
     Flattered, and inspired by Carleno’s obvious sincerity about his craft, Quick agreed to break away from her classical training and move toward a longtime interest of hers, jazz violin.
      Up until she met Carleno, Quick had trouble playing with traditional jazz groups because, before the onset of electric violins and violin pickups, the sound of her instrument got drowned out of the mix. Once Carleno hooked his own strings up to an amp, the pair wailed away, creating perfect balance of harmonies. The folk-classical compromise can be heard on Perpetual Motion’s first CD, “Ready, Willing and Able.”
      The duo played together for three or four years before setting foot in the studio, at which time Carleno and Quick decided it was time for a rhythm section. Susan Mikulich and Chad Johnson joined the group for three of the covers, and before long the quartet was a regular fixture at coffee houses like Java Creek in the Cherry Creek neighborhood.
      “Our songs work as both duets and as a full band,” Carleno said. “There is a lot more musical energy as a full band.”
      Johnson became known as a Jack of all trades around Denver, using his percussion skills to play anything from glass bottles to furniture to horseshoes. Mikulich was a pro on the bass. The original duo used the new, full sound to expand into blues, swing and bluegrass.
      Shortly after the band recorded its second album, “Surfing on Cloud Nine,” Johnson left the group and drummer Rob Chamberlin took his place. Around the same time, Michael Olson of Wind Machine took over as bassist. Coincidentally, Wind Machine’s Steve Mesple was an early mentor for Carleno.
      The quartet spends a lot of time creating a unique style of original music that they perform mostly at summer music festivals and jazz nightclubs. Most recently the band played at the Sunday night concert series, City Park Jazz, in Denver.
     “We try to let audiences know that we’re more than just a jazz band,” Carleno said. “We don’t like to pigeonhole out-selves into one category.”
      The band is largely thought of as a jazz band because of their improvisational talents. Most of Perpetual Motion’s songs allow for an improvisational solo by any given player.
      Traditionally, Carleno starts the composition of all of Perpetual Motion’s songs. Once he has mapped out the guitar angle, he plays it for other members of the band, who improvise counter melodies.
      “Before I was mostly in cover bands,” Carleno said. “Josie and I are more professional than the bands I played with in the past. Doing original material also keeps me really motivated to make the band work. Doing my own songs gives me a personal drive to make this a success.”
      Perpetual Motion is currently spending time in the studio recording its third CD. The album should be released in time for the holiday season.

Click on this link for a review on our CD Surfing on Cloud Nine.

“Taking the folk idiom in a different direction, Perpetual Motion‘s Ready, Willing and Able mixes guitar and violin into a contemporary acoustic sonnet. The melancholy and moving instrumentals will earn this disc an easy spot on the late-nite listening list.”

Dave Thomas
The Denver Post

“Best Orchestral Maneuvering” Perpetual Motion

“The trio Perpetual Motion – violinist Josie Quick, guitarist Tom Carleno and percussionist Chad Johnson – calls its work “acoustic jazz with a classical flair”. That’s wonderful, but it’s not all this energetic crew does. Whether performing Carleno’s original compositions or covering jazz, pop, Celtic, classic and folk style, Perpetual Motion conveys a sense of melodic freshness. The group’s debut album Ready, Willing and Able shows what can be accomplished when players pursue styles outside their instruments’ “Best-Suited” field.”

Westword Magazine
Best of Denver – Arts & Entertainment
June 28 – July 5, 1994

Perpetual Motion – Ready, Willing and Able – Swallowtail Mu probably would have winked at Quick before blurting out, “Hey baby, I think we could make beautiful music together.” Luckily for Quick, Carleno was a little more tactful, and instead opted for “I have some songs I’ve written. Would you like to get together sometime and play them?”

     Flattered, and inspired by Carleno’s obvious sincerity about his craft, Quick agreed to break away from her classical training and move toward a longtime interest of hers, jazz violin.
      Up until she met Carleno, Quick had trouble playing with traditional jazz groups because, before the onset of electric violins and violin pickups, the sound of her instrument got drowned out of the mix. Once Carleno hooked his own strings up to an amp, the pair wailed away, creating perfect balance of harmonies. The folk-classical compromise can be heard on Perpetual Motion’s first CD, “Ready, Willing and Able.”
      The duo played together for three or four years before setting foot in the studio, at which time Carleno and Quick decided it was time for a rhythm section. Susan Mikulich and Chad Johnson joined the group for three of the covers, and before long the quartet was a regular fixture at coffee houses like Java Creek in the Cherry Creek neighborhood.
      “Our songs work as both duets and as a full band,” Carleno said. “There is a lot more musical energy as a full band.”
      Johnson became known as a Jack of all trades around Denver, using his percussion skills to play anything from glass bottles to furniture to horseshoes. Mikulich was a pro on the bass. The original duo used the new, full sound to expand into blues, swing and bluegrass.
      Shortly after the band recorded its second album, “Surfing on Cloud Nine,” Johnson left the group and drummer Rob Chamberlin took his place. Around the same time, Michael Olson of Wind Machine took over as bassist. Coincidentally, Wind Machine’s Steve Mesple was an early mentor for Carleno.
      The quartet spends a lot of time creating a unique style of original music that they perform mostly at summer music festivals and jazz nightclubs. Most recently the band played at the Sunday night concert series, City Park Jazz

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